ECG 1a. Above ECG belongs to a 58 years-old man with chest pain.
It was recorded approximately 75 minutes after the onset of chest pain.
Precordial leads show ST elevation.
On the same day, his town was affected by a natural (flood) disaster and he could not be transferred for coronary angiography.
until the 9th hour after onset of his chest pain.
Below, you will find several ECGs of him demonstrating progressive ECG changes in a patient with
acute anterior myocardial infarction and no early intervention.

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ECG 1b. The same patient's ECG, 2 hours after the onset of chest pain.
ST segment elevation increased.

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ECG 1c. The same patient's ECG, 3 hours after the onset of chest pain.
ST segment elevation is less.

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ECG 1d. The same patient's ECG, 5.5 hours after the onset of chest pain.
Negative T waves are seen.

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ECG 1e. The same patient's ECG, 8.5 hours after the onset of chest pain.
Thirty minutes after recording of the above ECG, the patient reached our hospital and directly underwent to coronary angiography.
A stent was implanted to his LAD coronary artery. Cx was dominant and normal.
His non-dominant right coronary artery was totally occluded proximally and its distal segment was filled by bridge collaterals.

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ECG 1f. The same patient's ECG, next day.

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